VirtualizationHyper-vVMwareCloud ComputingBenefitsDeployments

Virtualization

In computing, virtualization refers to the act of creating a virtual (rather than actual) version of something, including (but not limited to) a virtual computer hardware platform, operating system (OS), storage device, or computer network resources. The different types of virtualization that can be implemented. Server Virtualization – consolidating multiple physical servers into virtual servers that run on a single physical server. Application Virtualization – an application runs on another host from where it is installed in a variety of ways.

  1. Benefits of virtualization include :

    • Reduce capital and operating costs.
    • Minimize or eliminate downtime.
    • Increase IT productivity, efficiency, agility, and responsiveness.
    • Provision applications and resources faster.
    • Enable business continuity and disaster recovery.
    • Simplify data center management.

What Is Hyper-V?

Microsoft Hyper-V is designed to offer “enterprise-class virtualization” for organizations with a data center or hybrid cloud. This option is a common choice for organizations who want to virtualize workloads, build a private cloud, scale services through a public cloud, or combine all three.

Hyper-V is built into Windows Server or can be installed as a standalone server, known as Hyper-V Server, both of which can ease the learning curve for virtualization administrators who already have knowledge and background with Microsoft products. It offers a unified set of integrated management tools, regardless of whether organizations are striving to migrate to physical servers, a private cloud, a public cloud, or a “hybrid” mixture of these three options.

Hyper-V Pros

  • Can deploy new virtual servers in minutes
  • Maintenance does not result in downtime
  • Simple live migrations
  • Easy backups
  • Comprehensive security through Windows Active Directory
  • Lower priced

What Is VMware vSphere?

VMware vSphere is a popular hypervisor choice for organizations hoping to achieve some degree of virtualization. Now on version 6.0, vSphere is highly configurable, which can make it an attractive choice for companies that are either going fully virtual or opting for a hybrid approach.

There are several different flavors of vSphere available, depending on organizational needs. vSphere Standard, Enterprise Plus, and Operations Management Enterprise Plus offer varying features and degrees of fault tolerance, allowing organizations to select the best coverage for their needs and growth goals.

vSphere Pros

  • Intuitive use
  • High-quality support availability
  • May be an optimal fit for major enterprises
  • Broad OS support
  • Offers access to governance capabilities
  • Transparent page sharing
  • Offers higher guests per host (512 vs. 384)

Uses of cloud computing

You’re probably using cloud computing right now, even if you don’t realize it. If you use an online service to send email, edit documents, watch movies or TV, listen to music, play games, or store pictures and other files, it’s likely that cloud computing is making it all possible behind the scenes. The first cloud computing services are barely a decade old, but already a variety of organizations—from tiny startups to global corporations, government agencies to non-profits—are embracing the technology for all sorts of reasons. Here are a few of the things you can do with the cloud:

  • Create new apps and services
  • Store, back up, and recover data
  • Host websites and blogs
  • Stream audio and video
  • Deliver software on demand
  • Analyze data for patterns and make predictions

1. Cost

Cloud computing eliminates the capital expense of buying hardware and software and setting up and running on-site datacenters—the racks of servers, the round-the-clock electricity for power and cooling, the IT experts for managing the infrastructure. It adds up fast.

2. Speed

Most cloud computing services are provided self-service and on demand, so even vast amounts of computing resources can be provisioned in minutes, typically with just a few mouse clicks, giving businesses a lot of flexibility and taking the pressure off capacity planning.

3. Global scale

The benefits of cloud computing services include the ability to scale elastically. In cloud speak, that means delivering the right amount of IT resources—for example, more or less computing power, storage, bandwidth—right when its needed, and from the right geographic location.

4. Productivity

On-site datacenters typically require a lot of “racking and stacking”—hardware set up, software patching, and other time-consuming IT management chores. Cloud computing removes the need for many of these tasks, so IT teams can spend time on achieving more important business goals.

5. Performance

The biggest cloud computing services run on a worldwide network of secure datacenters, which are regularly upgraded to the latest generation of fast and efficient computing hardware. This offers several benefits over a single corporate datacenter, including reduced network latency for applications and greater economies of scale.

6. Reliability

Cloud computing makes data backup, disaster recovery, and business continuity easier and less expensive because data can be mirrored at multiple redundant sites on the cloud provider’s network.

Types of cloud deployments: public, private, hybrid

Not all clouds are the same. There are three different ways to deploy cloud computing resources: public cloud, private cloud, and hybrid cloud.

Public cloud

Public clouds are owned and operated by a third-party cloud service provider, which deliver their computing resources like servers and storage over the Internet. Microsoft Azure is an example of a public cloud. With a public cloud, all hardware, software, and other supporting infrastructure is owned and managed by the cloud provider. You access these services and manage your account using a web browser.

Private cloud

A private cloud refers to cloud computing resources used exclusively by a single business or organization. A private cloud can be physically located in the company’s on-site datacenter. Some companies also pay third-party service providers to host their private cloud. A private cloud is one in which the services and infrastructure are maintained on a private network.

Hybrid cloud

Hybrid clouds combine public and private clouds, bound together by technology that allows data and applications to be shared between them. By allowing data and applications to move between private and public clouds, hybrid cloud gives businesses greater flexibility and more deployment options.